Summer Fun Ideas Your Kids Will Surely Love

This year, we’ve experienced an EXTRA LONG “summer” break from school. If you’re running out of activities for your kids or grands, try these boredom-busters for an afternoon of entertainment to keep their hands busy and get them out of the house.

Make Your Own Crayons

Who doesn’t have a box of broken crayons in a cabinet or drawer just taking up space? Create something new to give your friends in the neighborhood, or to use yourself!

Preheat your oven to 250 degrees. Unwrap and break crayons into small pieces. Separate the pieces into color groups, or keep it random. Pile the pieces into a silicone baking mold, making sure to overfill just a bit to allow for melting space. Place silicone mold on a baking sheet (use parchment paper underneath in case of spills). Bake for about 15 minutes. Remove from the oven and let wax cool completely (this is the hard part!) before popping out your new shapes.

Make a Father’s Day Card

Decorate eight wood craft sticks with markers or paint. Cut a piece of construction paper 4” by 5.5”. Write your five favorite things about Dad, or write him a sweet message. Line up the craft sticks side by side. With a glue stick, apply a generous amount of glue to the back of the paper, and attach it on top of the sticks, making sure not to move them. Apply pressure to get a good seal. When dry, roll up the sticks and tie with a ribbon. Make a “To Dad” tag and punch a hole in it to tie onto your card.

 

 

 

 

Make No-Sew Scented Sock Bunnies

An easy craft to do with all those single socks that never seem to find their lost mate! Mix several drops of your favorite essential oil into a large bowl of uncooked white rice. Fill the toe portion of a clean sock with rice and tie off with twine—about 1.5 cups should do it! (Hint: Fold the opening of the sock over a roll of packing tape for easier filling.) Fill the next section with about 3/4 cups of rice and tie off. Cut the top of the sock with about 2 inches left on top and trim into pointed bunny ears. Put a face on your new friend with a permanent marker. You can tie a bow around the middle with a colorful ribbon if you wish. Bonus: Pop bunny into the microwave for 30 seconds to a minute to scent the whole room and give your kids a cozy cuddle buddy for bedtime.

 

Visit a Farm

There are several farms to visit and explore in and around Fayette County. From fruit picking to learning about animals, spending the day outside in the fresh air is always a treat!

Ross Family Homestead
Kim and Chris Ross started their non-profit family farm with the intention of educating our community about micro-farming and animal rescue and care. There are multiple volunteer opportunities available throughout the summer, and all year. “Our goal is to foster a love of homesteading in the community as a way to live a more sustainable life for our planet. ”

South Jeff Davis, Fayetteville, 845-204-4169, therosshomestead.wixsite.com/rossfamilyhomestead

Minter’s Farm
Well-known in the area for its fresh Christmas tree farm, Minter’s Farm is also open during spring, summer and fall for visits and various events. The 11th annual Inman Antique Truck Show is tentatively marked for June 20.

283 Hill’s Bridge Rd., Fayetteville, 770.461.2840, mintersfarm.com

Adams Farm
Visit the farmstand for fresh produce grown on the property for three generations. In 1977, the Adams family built a roadside stand to sell its extra tomatoes and has expanded into one of the best U-Pic berry farms around. Berry picking season is through June for strawberries, raspberries and blackberries, and through August for blueberries. 1486 Georgia Hwy 54 West, Fayetteville, 770.461.9395, adamsfarmfayettevillega.com

Freebird Farm 
This niche farm in southern Fayetteville is a go-to for online learning about small farms and animals! With animals ranging from pigs to chickens to mini Zebu cows, owner Holly Longino has ample learning resources on the website, and a great Facebook following with Live videos teaching anything from hatching chickens to caring for baby goats. There are also on-site educational programs that line up with the school year. Follow Freebird Farm on Facebook for updates on educational opportunities. Freebirdfarm.com, facebook.com/ freebirdfarm

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